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Bumper Stickers Wiki

Bumper Stickers Wiki Bumper Stickers Wiki

See also[edit] Bumper (automobile) Car Sticker Country tag References[edit]

More recently, bumper stickers have become a route for advertising and a few companies offer to match car owners to advertisers willing to pay for the ad.

A paper or film face-stock makes up the top layer of the labelstock. The printing is done on the upper side of the facestock. An adhesive layer is applied to the bottom of the face stock. A silicone or release coating layer is applied to the upper side of the backing material.

A paper or film liner provides the bottom layer of the labelstock. An RFID circuit (chip and antenna) can be included in the paper or film face stock.

Different variations of decals include: water-slide or water-dip; and vinyl peel-and-stick. A water-slide (or water-dip) decal is screen-printed on a layer of water-soluble adhesive on a water-resistant paper, that must first be dipped in water prior to its application.

Bumper sticker supporting the 1976 Gerald Ford presidential campaign.

They have also been extensively applied to rear windows as well, where legislative measures have not banned such use. For instance in Sweden that is the normal place to put them and the bumper sticker is actually called “bakrutedekal” (rear window decal).

This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards. The specific problem is: unclear descriptions of layer order and meaning of facestock, labelstock, and backing material. A diagram might help.

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A decal (/ˈdiːkæl/, /dɪˈkæl/, /ˈdɛkəl/, /ˈdeɪkæl/) or transfer is a plastic, cloth, paper or ceramic substrate that has printed on it a pattern or image that can be moved to another surface upon contact, usually with the aid of heat or water.

Some people collect and trade stickers with other collectors.[1] These stickers use different form factors such as the popular vintage Puffy sticker types.

“How’s my driving” bumper stickers are often used on commercial vehicles so that employers can receive feedback about the driving habits of their employees.

Stickers are also used for embellishing scrapbooking pages. Kinds of stickers sold for this purpose include acrylic, 3D, cardstock, epoxy, fabric, flocked, sparkly, paper, puffy, and vellum. While in the earlier days of scrapbooking stickers were sold mostly on 2″x6″ sheets, now[when?] 6″x12″ and even 12″x12″ size sheets are very common.

Decals are commonly used on hot rod automobiles and plastic models. They are also used on guitars as a way of personalizing them.

A decal is composed of the following layers from top to bottom:

Upon contact with water, the glue is loosened and the decal can be removed from its backing; overlong exposure, however, dissolves the glue completely causing the decal to fail to adhere. A peel-and-stick decal is actually not a decal as described above, but a vinyl sticker with adhesive backing, that can be transferred by peeling off its base. The sign industry calls these peel-and-stick vinyl stickers vinyl-cut-decals.

Mass-production of vinyl decals starts with large rolls of vinyl sheet. Vinyl is fed through a plotter or large-format printer/cutter which prints the desired image and cuts out the desired shapes. Designs are typically created using specialized computer software and sent to the machines electronically. After the patterns are cut, excess vinyl on the sheet is removed in a process called weeding.[1] Finally, a paper pre-mask can be applied to the top of the vinyl design allowing easy application of multiple letters and shapes.

They are frequently distributed as part of promotional, and political campaigns; for example, in many voting districts in the U.S., stickers indicating an individual has voted are given to each voter as they leave the polling place, largely as a reminder to others to vote. Observers may clap hands, honk a horn or otherwise applaud a good sticker.

The word is short for decalcomania, which is the English version of the French word décalcomanie.

A bumper sticker is an adhesive label or sticker with a message, intended to be attached to the bumper of an automobile and to be read by the occupants of other vehicles—although they are often stuck onto other objects. Most bumper stickers are about 30 cm by 8 cm (12 in by 3 in) and are often made of PVC.

Variants of the bumper sticker have developed in recent years, including vinyl decals meant to be applied to a car’s rear windshield, and chrome emblems to be affixed to the body of the car itself, generally on the rear (the “Jesus fish” and its “Darwin fish” counterpart are popular examples).

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The first documented presidential election that used adhesive bumper stickers in political campaigns was the 1952 election between Dwight D. Eisenhower and Adlai Stevenson II.[10] Bumper stickers allowed citizens to show support for a candidate while still maintaining some anonymity.

See also[edit] Decal Pressure-sensitive tape Prizes Release liner Sticker album Sticker (Internet) – emoticon-like pictures References[edit]

1 Properties 2 Production process 3 Applications 4 Notes on printing 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Bumper stickers have sparked legal issues between people and states. A man with a bumper sticker containing indecent wording was convicted. The man’s conviction was reversed during Cunningham v. State (1991). The court referenced the First Amendment, stating “the provision regulating profane words on bumper stickers reaches a substantial amount of constitutionally protected speech and unconstitutionally restricts freedom of expression”[11]

Considerable variation exists around the world as to the context and purpose of stickers.

On some vehicles, some stickers are like trophy signs of World War II aeroplanes, either of locations visited or actions completed.

Early bumper stickers had printed directions on the back removable liner for applying them to the bumper of a car.[2] Due to the movement of the vehicle and changing weather conditions, the sticker needed to adhere well to the bumper surface.

Stickers placed on tires, usually called tire lettering, can be temporary or permanent. These spell out names or have graphics on them, to enhance the look of the car.

Early widespread uses of the advertising bumper sticker were for tourist attractions, such as Marine Gardens, Florida, Seven Falls, Colorado, Meramec Caverns in Missouri, and Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. Another popular advertisement was the “See Rock City” sticker. In the 1940s and 1950s, visitors to the site had a sticker applied to their car, which duplicated the famous signs painted on the roofs of barns throughout the southeastern USA. Tourist attraction staff would circulate through the parking lot, applying the promotional sticker to every car.

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“Shirat Hasticker” (“The Sticker Song”) by Hadag Nachash is an Israeli song composed entirely of bumper sticker slogans.

One variety of bumper sticker is the country tag. This is typically used for cars crossing international borders, and is overseen by the United Nations as the Distinguishing Signs of Vehicles in International Traffic, being authorized by the UN’s Geneva Convention on Road Traffic (1949) and Vienna Convention on Road Traffic (1968). Often the country code is displayed on the license plate itself.

These have (usually in the United States) been spun off into tags indicating a country with which the driver affiliates, or more humorously to indicate things like a region (OBX), support for rabbit rescue groups (BUN), etc.

Stickers placed on automobile bumpers, called bumper stickers, are often used by individuals as a way of demonstrating support for political or ideological causes. Identification of vehicle registration and last service details are two examples of stickers on the inside of most car windscreens. The term “window sticker” is generally used for vinyl labels which are stuck to the inside of a vehicle’s window, as opposed to water-resistant stickers that are stuck to the outside of a vehicle but can be affixed to anything.

People who opt to exhibit their individuality through these decals may take part in more acts of road rage. Colorado State University social psychologist, William Szlemko, found that aggressive driving is linked to the number of markers a person has on his/her car, regardless of the messages portrayed.[1]

Stickers can come in many different shapes and sizes and also vary widely in colour and design. They are often adhered to items such as lunchboxes, paper, lockers, notebooks, walls, cars, windows, and so on. Temporary name tags for example are frequently stickers.

Stickers are very widely used when an object requires with a word or idea. Brand stickers may be attached to products to label these products as coming from a certain company. They may also be used to describe characteristics of the products that would not be obvious from simple examination. A label dispenser is often used as a convenient way to separate the sticky label from its liner or backing tape.

The ichthys fish symbol, which represents Christianity, and its parodies are popular bumper sticker themes.

A car displaying an “Obama ’08” bumper sticker alongside its license plate

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Notes on printing[edit] Inkjet printing Laser printing Photocopy Offset printing Embossing Thermal printing See also[edit] Bumper sticker Ceramic decal Country tag Dry transfer Lithography Sticker Wall decals References[edit] External links[edit] Look up decal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Industrial Transfers and the Art of Decalcomania How to Install Vinyl Decals

1 Purpose 2 Application and removal 3 History 4 Around the world 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References

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Government agencies (and some Private Public Partnerships) use decals on vehicles for identification.[2] These decals are referred to as fleet markings and are required by law on all fire and law enforcement vehicles in the US. Most fleet markings are created from reflective vinyl with an adhesive backing that is applied in a peel-and-stick manner.

Various factors contributed to the development of the bumper sticker. Developments in material manufacturing during World War II led to the widespread use of daylight fluorescent inks, which were created by Bob Switzer and his brother Joe. These inks appeared to glow during the daytime and were useful to support various wartime activities; they were favored by early bumper sticker manufacturers after the war. In addition, the first commercially produced pressure-sensitive stickers appeared after World War II; new developments in adhesive materials led to the production of paper strips with adhesive on the back.[7] In addition, the rise of consumer use of vinyl after World War II led to the eventual use of this material in bumper stickers.

Some people put stickers (magnetic and permanent) on their cars to advertise their business, or to show support for sports teams or political views.

Stickers applied to guitars are called guitar decals. Post-it notes are removable stickers having glue on only part of the back, and are usually sold blank.

Categories: InfographicsPropaganda by mediumPropaganda techniques by mediumStickersAutomotive accessories

Before bumper stickers, advertisers used other methods of displaying their wares. In the horse-drawn carriage era, advertisers printed on horsefly nets with the name of a business.[3] In the 1930s and 1940s, bumper signs were printed on metal or cardboard and wired to the chrome bumpers.[4] Lester Dill, promoter of Meramec Caverns in Missouri, was an ardent adopter of the bumper sign to attract motorists to his site.[5] Using a windowshield decal was another option. These paper strips could be wetted and placed inside a car window.[6] However, these strips did not hold up well when placed on a bumper.

Bumper stickers can be commercial, religious, secular, humorous, or in support of a sports team or other organization. They may promote or oppose a particular philosophical or political position. In some countries, such as the United States, bumper stickers are a popular way of showing support for a candidate for a government seat and become more common during election years. In others, such as the United Kingdom, they are rarely seen in any form.

Many experts credit Forest P. Gill, a silkscreen printer from Kansas City, Kansas, USA, as the developer of the bumper sticker.[8][9] Gill recognized that the self-adhesive paper used during the second world war could be used to advertise promotional products in the late 1940s and beyond.

There are some “easy to remove” bumper stickers and magnetic bumper stickers. Bumper stickers can be removed with a razor blade, penetrating oil or a heat gun. Home remedies also include using common household items, such as WD-40 or paint thinner.

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A sticker is a type of label: a piece of printed paper, plastic, vinyl, or other material with pressure sensitive adhesive on one side. They can be used for decoration or for functional purposes, depending on the situation.

The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called “décalquer” (which means to copy by tracing); it became widespread during the decal craze of the late 19th century.

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